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Posts tagged "Divorce"

Important points to remember about gray divorce

While Colorado divorces are often pigeonholed as involving people who are younger and got married early before realizing that they were not a right match for one another, older people are also getting divorced with a notable frequency. The so-called "gray divorce" might sound unusual, but it is not. People who are considering their life as they reach a certain age and decide that they might want something else are prone to a gray divorce. Concerns about how family and friends will react are natural, but people have a right to their happiness. Understanding the statistics and the foundational issues for gray divorce is an important step before moving forward.

Divorce rates rise in January and will be impacted by tax changes

A new year brings many changes for Coloradans and those who are having marital problems can be affected significantly. This applies not just to the decision to get a divorce, but how the divorce will change their lives in the future. Knowing about tendencies when it comes to family law issues and the possible aftereffects is critical from the beginning and having legal assistance can assess the situation and find the preferable avenue to handle it.

Understanding a divorce decree

The end of a marriage in Colorado can be a difficult time for both parties. There are many issues that will be in dispute. When a couple determines that a divorce is the best alternative, it is important to remember that there are many factors that come into play. This goes beyond the disagreements that are common in any divorce proceeding. Legal factors must also be considered. One key legal matter is the divorce decree. A lawyer can help with every aspect of the divorce from the beginning to the end when the decree is given.

Alimony will be impacted by the new tax laws for 2019 and beyond

When Coloradans are at the end of a marriage and planning a divorce, there are a litany of issues they will consider during the process. Divorce is an emotional rollercoaster and sometimes the future can be obscured by the present woes. It remains important, however, to think about how the divorce will impact them financially in myriad ways. That can include tax implications they might otherwise not have considered. One factor that has been discussed in detail recently is the new tax laws created by the Trump Administration and enacted by congress.

The right approach when disputes arise in a divorce

For people in Colorado whose marriage has run its course, with a decision that it is preferable to part ways, a best-case scenario is that they will agree on most or all issues related to the marriage, have amicable negotiations for child support, child custody, spousal support and property division, and move on. The reason this is referred to as a "best" case scenario in a mostly negative situation is that it happens so infrequently. Oftentimes, there is contentious disagreement over some or all issues in the marriage. This can include children, property, division of assets, asset distribution and more. Understanding the components of a divorce proceeding can be key for adequate preparation and be beneficial as the case proceeds.

Might a child be interviewed in determining child custody?

When a Colorado couple gets a divorce and child custody is an issue, the dispute between the parties might lend itself to the child being pushed off to the side as an unwitting part of the process. With a younger child or toddler who cannot make a statement regarding an opinion, this makes some semblance of sense. However, since the best interests of the child are at stake, it is wise to know where the child stands on child custody and visitation. This is where the law allows for an interview to be conducted.

Information with child custody relocation in Colorado

After a Colorado couple has divorced, child custody will already have been determined as part of the court's decision or via negotiated agreement between the parties. This can be one of the more complex areas of dispute in a divorce. However, just because the case is over and there is an order does not mean that the matter is settled permanently. In some cases, the parent with the majority of residential custody will want to relocate from the previous residence and this can impact a variety of issues such as parenting time. Knowing what goes into relocation and how the law handles it is imperative to all parties.

What if there is a dispute over visitation schedule in Colorado?

The ideal situation when a Colorado couple has divorced and has children is that they agree to put their differences aside and work together in the child's best interests. Part of that is adhering to a reasonable visitation schedule so both parents will be in the child's life. However, there are few ideal situations and even amicable partings can become contentious. One issue that can be troublesome is if there is a dispute with parenting time. Understanding what the law says about this is key to dealing with it.

What should I know about temporary orders in a Colorado divorce?

During a Colorado divorce, many issues will be up for debate and discussion. That includes spousal support, child custody, child support and more. As the couple prepares to permanently end their marriage, they will often have worries about finances and other factors while the case is going on. This is where temporary orders should be factored in and understood.

Legal help is critical for both parties when determining alimony

One of the most difficult aspects in a Colorado divorce is determining who will pay alimony, how much it will be, and for how long it will last. Alimony can have multiple alternative terms including maintenance or spousal support. Regardless of what it is called, it is a fundamental issue and often a concern for people who have parted ways and find themselves needing to pay for the upkeep of a former spouse or are the spouse who asserts that he or she is in need. The paying spouse might not have a large enough income to pay. The receiving spouse might not have the current ability to support him or herself in the same lifestyle as they had during the marriage. All of this will be assessed during a divorce.

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Mary Kay Kramer, P.C.
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